Posts Tagged ‘Afghan’

He ain’t heavy, he’s my loader…

October 17, 2012

Here’s a couple more Afghan support weapons by Eureka which I picked up at Salute 2012.   They’re the usual joy to paint, even if my photos aren’t very good. The recoiless rifle is on a very big base, and there’s a big space near the loader because the ammo box wasn’t in the bag.

Thankfully Nic at Eureka was happy to send me one all the way from Australia, not that I’ve had time to paint and add it. The weapon was a little tricky to get together right but plenty of testing was the way to do it, with gentle tweaks to get the legs of the two-part tripod the right height.

Here’s the Eureka Afghan mortar, which has one figure sculpted so you can set him up with his hand in the ammo box. Well I was impressed. A much tighter fit on the base which I prefer.

Again a slightly tricky assembly of the weapon with three pieces which have to be glued simultaneously as I see it. Should you glue the tube into the base plate seperately it might not fit onto the bipod without being too splayed. Tricky but not impossible.

Again a fine example of the brilliance of digital photography is the small hair on the base plate while making everything else slightly blurred. The hair has since been removed, imprisoned and under going severe interrogation.

Hovelly Versatile

February 29, 2012

The great compound building spree starts to grind to a halt as all three near completion, spurred on by me discovering Channel 5’s “Royal Marines: Mission Afghanistan” on demand via the Xbox and boring the whole family with episodes back-to-back, leaving them feeling like they’ve done a tour themselves but in a single Sunday.

My idea was to cast a building several times and in laying it out differently make a village which didn’t look like a housing estate. Having managed a trio to start with I must admit the roofs done this way is not as good as the way I did it before.  Not sure why I changed style, some half-arsed idea about doing seperate roofs for added variety I recall. It didn’t really work did it?

Roof problems aside I’m happy with how much this speeds up making compounds, as the walls are simple. Above they are made from foam board carved for irregularly,  boshed with filler and a light sanding

For this one I’ve added a dome on the roof, more of a gaming tradition than anything I’ve actually seen in photos.

The walls have been made differently on this one reflecting an observation on the different styles of Afghani walls. Many seem to have been made with large dried mud bricks, which is then rendered with a coating of mud. This often crumbles in places but the brick pattern is still slightly visible.

The effect has worked and was made easy by using Cork Expansion Gap Inserts, or strips of cork to you and me. I’ve seen these in Wickes for around six quid a packet, which as a modelling material is well priced. However my Domestic Goddess found me a pack in the PoundlandQuidKingdomNinetyNinePee shop and there’s miles of it. Hurrah for marriage!

I’ve then cut these to brick size and laid them into walls, taking care to make the walls based on the brick size to keep it simple.Then the usual rendering with filler and a light sanding.

This is the final one and I fancied something a bit different, so it’s set on a slight mound, has a smaller yard and the gate is on the corner with a few steps down. One corner of the roof is missing and there’s a small hole in the rear, ideal for snipers.

It also has the bricked walling which blends fairly well with the more regular irregularity of the building’s wall. It has a fair amount of height to it and therefore more variety.

Together this trio works well, so I’m looking forward to putting them down with the other four. I have one more casting in hand at the moment but having started a wrecked market from seeing one on  Royal Marines: Mission Afghanistan”  it’ll just have to wait.

There’s some small detailling left on these but I got so excited with them I couldn’t wait to post them up. A feeling I imagine you share.

In for a compound in for a penny

February 27, 2012

This humble Middle Eastern abode is very much a work-in-progress,  hopefully another Slug Industries product soon, borne from my desire to have a few more compounds from reading about the Royal Anglicans time in Afghanistan in book “Attack State Red”. The reports of inter-compound fighting reminded me of fighting in Stalingrad, which explains why Sangin has earned the nickname “Sangingrad” amongst our brave forces.

For a good skirmish game you do need to get inside the buildings, hence the lift off lid. I’m happy with the scale as the rather fine Eureka figures shows it’s a good fit. There’s three of these on the bench, which will take me up to seven compounds in total, which is just enough for the game I have in mind. The others can be seen here.

Here’s one in place for it’s fitting of walls. These are foamboard, which is very easy to work and they’ll get a coating of filler to get an irregular finish. The other two will be cork, as I’m after a certain effect on those which you might be lucky enough to read about later. Bet you can’t wait, eh?

You can see how these developed here.

 

Jeep Beats

September 26, 2010

Blurred but still beautiful, one of a few “technicals” I’ve been working on and one of the best. This started off as a Chinese made budget toy from Tesco, which I’ve taken apart and modded before putting back together. One thing deffo worth remembering is to remove the “windows” and leave them out. On one of the others I’ve put the front and back windscreen back in and it’s proved to be a right pain in the arse.

This one has had the window removed and thrown away, and it simplifies the whole rebuild. I’ve been a bit flash on this one, the dents are applied greenstuff but carved to look like dents, the driver, gunner and passengers are all from Stan Johansen’s rather nifty Jihadi range and work really well. I know some folk do damn Stan’s range ever so slightly by saying they’re not the best miniatures, and fair play to them, but I prefer to think they are rather special because a lot of what he makes other folk simply don’t do. Female civilians in Burqas? Armed Civilians? Drivers? Gunners? He has them all, and not without a little humour – in the cafe/market set there’s a small table, nothing unusual about that of course, until you turn it over to reveal a hidden AK.

Compound Interest

September 25, 2010

From my highly evolved research for playing ultra modern Afghanistan I’ve kept my eyes on a number of sources when it comes down to the architecture of the area. One surprisingly informative source has been Ross Kemp’s documentories on Afghanistan, which tend to focus on the rural areas and give a very good view of things, plus these are all available on Youtube  so anyone can watch them.

A few things seem self-evident about Afghans and their homes, they do like their privacy and so rarely seem to have exterior windows, plus they like to put high walls around everything. Also everything looks ancient, irregular and roughly finished, so that does make modelling easier and a bit more fun.

These photos show the bulk of the compounds I’ve made.  For these I decided to use MDF of 3mm and 6mm thickness. This did mean drilling and jigsawing doorways and windows, which rapidly became a chore rather than a hobby, but thankfully they’re quite crude buildings with few of both. The walls sections and bases were all pinned and glued together, although I have gone for the baseless look which I think suits them better.

The roofs are typically all drop ins and removable for playing inside the buildings. The walls have all been finished with the very wonderful Basetex from Irregular Miniatures, a fun packed endeavour verging on finger painting. The floors were coated with PVA glue, covered with sand, and then painted just before the whole thing was washed with a dirty finish.

The final result varies between the okay and the reasonably good. MDF is solid but you can’t do much with it without power tools and getting covered in dust. These models all weigh on the heavy side, and could easily be used to clobber opponents to death and very likely without damaging the paintwork. Appealing as that might be the hunt continues for a better and faster way of making things.

Figures used for scale are Eureka US Marine Scout and Stan Johansen Miniatures Jihad Civilian ranges, and very nice they are too.