Posts Tagged ‘microarmour’

Could do Better

October 9, 2009

DSCF2351Well finally here it is, my very first game report and to be totally honest with you if it were to be marked it wouldn’t be a pass and as the title suggests there’d be a personal message in red at the bottom. It started all rather well, the pictures of the table worked fine but by the time it came to play two elements came into town in recording the game. Firstly under the andrenalin fuelled pressure of playing Uncle Focus buggered right off and Auntie Blurred decided to visit for the weekend, and latterly as taking the photos slowed the play the need to take photos waned a little as did the already questionable quality. I apologise in advance for this, it’s left me scratching my head as to just how other folk manage it.

The game itself was a very simple contact scenario in a town with two bridges, the British aiming to take control of at least one bridge while the Germans were to deny them this. The Bridges had been guarded by very poor German troops who had decided to desert after a visit from the RAF, and German reenforcements had been delayed by supply difficulties, so it really was a very open scenario from the start.

DSCF2352The Germans would be starting from the town side, and would be guaranteed good cover for all of their forces.

DSCF2363As they were to have the first turn there was a more than reasonable chance they’d be able to reach the main bridge before the British arrived, and would enjoy plenty of cover in defending it.

DSCF2374The nearby pontoon bridge would be more difficult to reach, but getting it in sight and preventing anyone from crossing it would be quite simple.

DSCF2379The Germans began their push towards the pontoon bridge, getting a pair of Panzer IVs lined up on it, HMG and Mortar teams racing towards position when disaster struck as the commander failed his second command roll. Desperate to gain ground he pushed on aiming to get into the church tower in the following turn.

DSCF2384Unfortunately things got worst on the other side as the commander failed his first command roll with a blunder. This left both armour and infantry units sitting watching as the HQ led just a small armour element forward, with a Puma leading the only Tiger into the town.

DSCF2387HQ then succeeded in getting some of the stalled infantry on the move, with a Stug taking point.

DSCF2388German HQ then failed a command roll but made the most of it by taking a well covered position and hoped to rectify a rather poor deployment on the second turn.

DSCF2389The British arrive and push on and on, a recon element reaches the pontoon bridge in good time and helps in surpressing the pair of Tiger IVs apparently parked up behind a distant hedge.

DSCF2399Meanwhile at the main bridge a scout car and a Cromwell decide to slowly cross the bridge towards what they think is a Puma but is actually a Stug. Hoping to knock it out proves only enough to surpress it.

DSCF2405One of the Puma has actually made a mad dash into a forward position, covered from fire but able to surpress anything trying to cross the pontoon bridge.

DSCF2406While the other has mounted the hill to cover the bridge in support of the stug, while Germany infantry dashes into the cover of buildings all over the town. The Brits dither but do manage to get a powerful group at one end of the bridge.

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Suddenly all hell breaks lose. One German command makes it to the church tower and is able to target mortar fire onto the attempted crossing of the pontoon, only to attract tons of fire in return destroying it and leaving the German left flank without command. The Brits on the road bridge advance at a crawl but eventually manage to take out the Stug facing them. The advance Puma in the centre enjoys a number of potshots at various enemy targets, while the Tiger moves through the square towards a supporting position with a Panzer IV following it. With crafty maneuvering the Brits manage to bring guns to bear on the advance Puma and knock it out. Having reduced the British advance to a mix of crawl and traffic jam the Tiger is unsure which way to go and so plays it safe in trying to find a defensive position behing the statue in the square.

DSCF2414Massed on the bridge the Brits decide to test the water by pushing forward with recon, only to lose it as soon as it leaves the bridge while German infantry pours surpressing fire onto the bridge itself from the safety of various buildings. The British infantry at the rear decide to brew-up.

DSCF2423The Brits at the pontoon bridge fare better, managing to take out one of the uncommanded Panzer IVs and sweep towards the square where a Panzer IV has re-enforced the Tiger’s position. Every gun fires at the Tiger, the smoke clears and it is only pinned. Plenty of shots are exchanged without loss, while the German HQ makes a dash to bring the offscreen Panzer IV into play. Just as he manages it there’s a massive explosion as the Tiger is eventually destroyed.

DSCF2435The Germans realise their flank has been turned and despite a brave effort it’s not long before they’re totally outgunned and face the danger of being surrounded and start withdrawing. As the smell of fresh tea spreads across the town the British do not pursue them, choosing to search for biscuits instead.

Circling Overland

September 19, 2009

DSCF2366It could be the buzz of a Mosquito, or the hum of an Auster but no the strange noise in the skies above is that of a Slug using technology which isn’t quite in keeping with the period on the table. We set up this evening for an afternoon of playing BKC tomorrow, and I can’t help thinking the tiny swine is pre-plotting mortar fire, interlocking fields of fire and making my half of the table one large killing zone from turn one. Time will out of course, but if anyone has any reenforcements they could force march to my aid overnight it’d be gratefully appreciated.

Base Sick Instinct

September 12, 2009

DSCF2271Well I’ve finally finished what remained of my armies for this WW2, and about bleeding time too. Every thing after this is a luxury, so I can concentrate on a few scenics and the whole point of this activity tons of games. Hurrah! There’s a bit of work due on the storage front but by all estimations I should have these all stored away in time for… well in time to get them out for a game next weekend so long as tine is willing as we’ve off to the Euro Militaire show next Sunday. It’s always a difficult one to make into a family day out as the dominant species does appear to be middle-aged male virgins who have no idea how one should act in the presence of either women nor children, and the fact that many of them are mainland Europeans doesn’t help.

DSCF2267The best of the latest are the command bases above, again going for more of a mini-diorama look than a typical base.

DSCF2268This is the British Para Command base, with them taking cover behind a fence.

DSCF2269Likewise for the German Infantry Command, well I had half a fence section left, plus the luxury of a Kettenkrad.

DSCF2270Meanwhile the German Paras have choosen a more rural setting, covering behind a haywagon.

DSCF2272One of the regular bases with a bit of detail is this of a Tommy HMG crew legging it through long grass. As nice as these and the others look, and as happy as I am to have them finally finished I must admit I’ve grown sick of basing infantry over the past week.

A true Dutch treat

September 10, 2009

miniaturegamingWeb savvy tabletop gamers are used to regular and wonderful excess, usually it’s pretty predictable such as great paint jobs on miniatures, a stunning scenic or a massed combination of both in a great tabletop layout. However Dutch 6mm gamer Patrick Van Gompel has taken one enormous step beyond this, sure he’s got the well painted figures plus a collection of great scenics and yes they’re all combined into a layout – then he’s turned it into an animation which runs at over eight minutes – a truly stunning effort which can be seen here.

Flocking bases

September 7, 2009

DSCF2218Following a comment from fellow blogger Ssendam asking about my basing technique I thought it would make much more sense to show it rather than explain it, and it’s one of those things a lot of us seasoned gamers do without thinking and it’s not obvious to newcomers to the wonderful hobby of wargaming. Above is a GHQ German Horsedrawn Wagon painted and washed superglued onto a plastic base after it has been roughly textured with green putty or milliput – green putty drys much quicker but pongs and can remove paint, milliput takes much longer to dry but can be sculpted and can be painted before fully dried. Once dried the base has been painted with  Vallejo Flat Earth, and then roughly drybrushed with any other darker brown. A small stone has been superglued on for added detail.

DSCF2224If you want to add a little more depth to the brown, like you might on a very muddy base, add a dark wash. You might have noticed how I’m using brown before adding the grass, whereas a lot of folk use green. This is a personal preference borne of knowing how after a few years flock can fall off and this way it reveals the mud below, combined with liking quite rough looking bases with a lot of soil showing.

DSCF2219For flock I typically use three different types based on the palette I want to use across an entire project. Given that this project is Europe ’44-’45 I decided to go for a high summer look. Above is a blurred image of my dark green flock, but it still functions to give an idea of the colour, which I mixed from three bags of rather posh flock from EMA. It’s meant to represent the best kept lawns you might find.

DSCF2220Here’s my light mix, a combination of several bags of Javis flock which is typically spongier, mixed with a little of the EMA dark stuff. This is meant to represent sun-bleached grass.

DSCF2222Here’s my mid-range tone everyone’s favourite static grass. It comes as this wide spectrum of colours ready mixed.

DSCF2225Back to the wagon and here’s the first coat of PVA glue sparingly dotted around. Now I’m after a patchy effect, so I add each layer in patches. For thicker or more regular grass you use thicker or more regular coats of glue.

DSCF2226Then as speedily as you can pile on the first layer of flock, here it’s the darkest one. I’ve gently tapped it down, and then tapped off the bulk of the excess. Now at this stage, before the glue dries, if you leave it as shown the glue will spread and when dried most of this flock will stay on the base. It’s totally acceptable as it is, but I want a bit more soil showing.

DSCF2228So I wait less than a minute and then blow off the whole of the excess flock. This is much more what I’m looking for.

DSCF2229Having let the first layer dry completely, I now add the second coat of PVA glue. Again this is patchy, some on bare soil some on the flock already there.

DSCF2230On goes the light mix, follow the same procedure as previously to get the look you’re after.

DSCF2236I decided on a bush, which I added before the static grass, using Javis bush material. Again this is a mix of two tones from seperate bags, chopped roughly together. To attach to the base I use superglue gel, into which I press a large pinch of the Javis hedge mix. When dried you can, should you choose, pluck and form a good looking bush which you can then set with a little liquid superglue gently poured onto the top branches. This, like the PVA glue will produce some shine, all of which will vanish once you matt varnish the base in it’s entirity.After the bush I put a few blobs of PVA around for the final layer, the static grass.

DSCF2238Here’s the near finished base, it just needs a matt varnish, which I’ve not done as I spray my bases en-masse. Obviously using three types of flock triples the time it takes to finish each base but I think the finished look is worth it. It is worth experimenting as you go along, to get the kind of finish you’re after, one thing worth considering is mixing near identical shades of flock, for 6mm scale it produces the kind of detail you need for realism on such a delicate scale.

Easy Glider

September 6, 2009

DSCF1488Most 6mm gamers would agree how GHQ produce a lot of great looking models, typically they’re small bubble packs of five vehicles, however they do produce a series of Combat Commands, boxed sets for entire regiments and the like but most of these are simply collection of the bubble packs. By far the sexiest one is the British Horsa Glider Assault Team partly because it’s British but also because it’s effectively Operations Tonga or Market Garden in a box and excites me as much as when I first heard about either of those operations via films like “The Longest Day” or “A Bridge too Far”.

Nostalgia aside this is a very simple kit, it comes with 48 Para’s, a few heavy weapons, and four jeeps, although my set came with six so thanks to GHQ for that. It also comes with 3 Horsa gliders which are basically four part kits as seen above, and with a scale wingspan of around 95mm are absolute beasts. There’s little filing to do as there’s little sign of mould marks nor flash, and the parts typically fit together well.

DSCF1490The instructions suggest a number of ways of putting them together, depending on your preference be it for the Horsa in flight, on the ground, or on the ground with the nose opened to get the bigger gear out. The most fragile part to start with is the tail assembly which did need a slight bend to set everything square. To start I decided I’d go for Horsa in flight, as I’d prefer them all singing all dancing.

DSCF1494Lo and behold within minutes there’s your basic Horsa, very simple and to be frank I wish I’d just gone for this level of modelling as it got fiddly and frustrating very quickly.

DSCF1497Thankfully GHQ supply spares for the fiddly bits, some you might need because you get it wrong, others because not all the parts on all the sprues are complete.

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First on is the skid plate, which you really can do without, and the nose wheels. The nose wheels are on a long rod which looks likely to snap off pretty easily so I’ve made it shorter and therefore more stable.

DSCF1502Next are the main wheels either side which are quite fiddly too. The small indentation to the right of the skid-plate is where you need to drill your hole if you’re going to mount it on a flight stand. A bit of a must-do as I see it.

DSCF1506Once an in-flight version is completed this is what you’ll have, and the keener eyed might have noticed a problem, it sits arse heavy, mainly because of the skid-plate. Even without it the model will be arse heavy, and although there’s some space inside where you could try counter balancing don’t bother trying like I did with later attempts as I estimate the weight needed to make it sit properly or nose heavy is around the eight gram mark. Of course this won’t be noticed when it’s in flight, and for deployed after landing it’s not a great problem, although I found it frustrating and put the project in a corner for a while as if it were a sulky child.

During landing it was quite usual for a Horsa to lose it’s wheels and skid-plate, so the other two have none of the extras and sit at a more realistic angle.

DSCF1932A quick splash of paint later and it was onto putting the invasion stripes on, just to prevent the Yanks from shooting them up by mistake. I’ve gloss varnished the wings for this to make it easier, and also bought the GHQ invasion stripes decals. I wasn’t too chuffed to realise how despite the decals being the official ones none of them were big enough for the job in hand. Just why the invasion stripes aren’t, like wallpaper, long strips which can be cut to size is beyond me but hey ho…

DSCF2022On goes the first stripes, I’ve put them slightly out of place because I didn’t want to have to deal with the sloping edge of the wing.

DSCF2024When it came to put the second set on another difficulty made itself known, basically the stripes aren’t of equal width either. When I started this project I laughed when a chum suggested painting these on, preferring as I did to use decals, but it was at this stage I wish I’d listened. These decals are manically fiddly to start with, and it doesn’t help to have that multipled, especially when I believe it’s fair to assume using GHQ decals will make it easier.

DSCF2211Here’s the trio finished, the one atop is the one with wheels, etc, the others don’t have them. A lovely little set fit for anyone’s tabletop, and still the sexiest of the Battle Command series. Considering they’re really just a four piece kit GHQ would do well to address the invasion stripe problem, as for me that alone was the longest part of the entire assembly and painting. I’m still scratching my head at how I’ll fit these into the storage box supplied.

Communistic work drive

September 6, 2009

DSCF2212One of the most positive effects the web has on the wargaming community is how competitive it makes us all, and just how that increases both the effort we all put in and the quality we strive for. I’m not exempt from this feverish mix of one-upmanship and public display of the Protestant work ethic. For a couple of weeks now I’ve regularly had my gast flabbered over at the 6mm forum run by Mike Angel by a number of users who seem to be amassing armies with the speed of an out of control rocket car but without the pyrotechnic delight of a huge fireball as a finale. Admittedly they’re forming ranks and files for Napoleonics, but none the less it does look as if within mere moments of the lead landing on their doormat they’re painted it, based it and posted the photos on the web.

So it was time for 6mil mansions to convert to a Stalinesque factory and see just how much I might be able to bash out. I started with eighty blank bases, and the attaching of adhesive magnets to them, each of which had to be cut to size from a roll. Next was scoring the top of each base to give a texture to make sure anything stuck to them stays stuck. Combined this simple combination of activities took Saturday afternoon, and strangely enough reminded me of having ingrown toenails removed, the only connection being how the latter is a much more fun filled way to spend an afternoon. Sunday was spent supergluing the figures onto bases, and where time allowed putting some texture onto the bases, the output in it’s entirity can be seen above, just over forty bases almost finished.

DSCF2213Obviously it’s good to get so much done in a single sitting, but in such a large number it did become a mite tedious. One great positive is it shows how my idea for using scenics details on command stands does help them really stand out. Above is an infantry command with a haystack on the base, look how well it sticks out from the trayful in the first picture, as well as the other command stands.

DSCF2214The same is true of what will become a sweet little command base of British Para’s tucked behind a fence with a track on the other side. Mixing Adler and GHQ figures seems to be working okay, and it gives a great variety to the stands. As these get completed I’ll be posting photos, but I’m not sure I want to try another Stalin inspired mad production drive, it is quite dull and, as if further explanation were needed, it show why communism was bound to fail.

Base of brothers

August 15, 2009

DSCF1882Just a couple of bases of GHQ paras this week, one all attacking from being a row of bushes, the other frantically trying to focus a PIAT and grenade attack. Placed adjacent they make a fine wrecking crew.

DSCF1885Another development has been me finally getting to grips with the camera aided in part by having my old single bulb lamp die and me replacing it with a fluorenscent one which throws a much wider and brighter light finally revealling all the detail.

COMETh the tank

August 15, 2009

DSCF1874Okay it’s not the best known tank of WW2, seeing only really the last seven or so months of the war, but if you’re playing late war Brits it was there and so you need a few Comets and these GHQ ones fit the bill perfectly. Expect the usual sharp cut detail, but also the perfectly scaled but look at it too hard and it’ll bend barrel.

DSCF1877I’ve spent ages picking out the detail on these with various complimentary tones and not a hint of it shows up on the photos.

DSCF1881The basing has been kept simple, slight irregular surfacing to the base, two tones of brown, three types of flock and a couple of bushes.

DSCF1879Made one base decidely urban, but as it stands it looks too clean so I’ll be coming back and putting some rubble about and anything else I can think of, or that you might care to suggest. No I’m not making another piano.

Jeep into the unknown

August 15, 2009

buDSCF1865What’s that tearing through the countryside? Why it’s a tidy line of GHQ jeeps tearing into action in the style of the Para’s or the SAS.

DSCF1864Now the GHQ standard jeeps come in two basic forms, windscreen up or windscreen down and with just a driver who wears a yank style helmet. For me this is a handay variety, but not enough if you’re likely to be playing six tiles in close proximity. The first thing Ive done is filed those helmets to look like a beret, then I’ve added two or three more figures including one with a .50 cal, plus a couple of boxes here and there. The finished look is a quite threatening little convoy likely to worry just about any unit unfortunate to be set against it.

DSCF1907After Mike asked for bigger photo’s I’ve had a bash, and generally I’m not having a lot of luck with them. I’m at the limit of my camera’s ability which is far beyond my own, out of around 30 photos, two weren’t blurred but even with these ones (above & below) you can see how the rear third of the base is in focus while the rest isn’t. They did prove handy for revealing fluff and hairs though, and have been tweezered to perfection.

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