Posts Tagged ‘Uncle Crouchie’

Kraut Rock

April 23, 2012

This handsome bunch of burgers are the old BEF miniatures early WW2 Germans. Since the range was taken over by Warlord they’ve been changed slightly making these beauties out of production – as if they weren’t brilliant enough already.

Now before you start telling me just how marvelous I am for this tremendous paintjob I have to hold up my hand and stop you. These lovely little pjs are those of the boy Slug, I think they’re brilliant and I’m a hard hobby taskmaster. I wish I’d managed such a level of painting by the tender age of fifteen and one third.

Actually I’m not sure I could match these, lucky for me I don’t really do old Germans otherwise I’d have to find another excuse.

The epaulettes, rank markings and other emblems are all paint, not a transfer in sight.

Of course having seen what he’s managed with these I’m inclined towards buying the new lot.

Saxon Legs

April 23, 2012

The motor pool for our Jihadistan campaign has swollen with the addition of this brilliant Saxon APC from Sloppy Jalopy having been originally created by Uncle Crouchie. Although the Saxon is out of service, and not really ultra modern, it is one of my favourite British vehicles. Luckily Jihadistan is fictional so I can have any kit I want… hurrah! This kit is a resin hull with metal detailing, all bar the wheels easy to put together with most parts fitting well.

Working out exactly how the wheels fitted was the hardest part. The instructional drawing was a sketch which measured about one and a half inches square. I spent ages working out how to fit the suspension bars, the axles and the connecting driveshaft. I was happy with it until it came to fit the wheels as I’d wrongly sited the whole lot by about 2mm and the rear wheels wouldn’t fit. I ending up having to bosh it. Either way the wheels do feel delicate so I made have to come back and fit those more solidly.

The crewman is from Old Glory UK, one of their slowly growing modern British range. Andy did apologise for it’s slow evolution but it grows at an agreeable pace as far as I do things, so no raids on piggy banks for a small pewter Pyrenees which doesn’t get painted for a year. I found it and the ones I have in hand for a Warrior very easy to work with, especially after the problems I had with the ones I previously used.

I added a stowage bin to the back mainly because they tended to have them, even though all the X-marked boxes are stowage too, but also because I could fill it with some of the S&S stowage bits. I highly recommend the stowage sets, they’re all metal and feature everything you might need, some bits you hadn’t thought of and there’s loads of pieces.

Trench Afoot

February 16, 2012

Gutted as I was to realise I’d already used the pun “Last Ditch Effort” I’m happy with this new secnic which I’ve just completed. It’s not only a handy piece but it proved to me how our humble Slug Industries sandbags and planking actually knock together to make a decent model without the hours I’d have spent in the past by hand making every single piece.

It also gave me an opportunity to use modrock, a bag of which I’d bought around a decade ago but never even opened. It’s a great material, gloriously messy with a hint of mudpies making the endeavour an even deeper recession into child-like joy. To start with I glued the sandbags in place, then used scrap foamboard to make formers for the ground. I wanted the look of earth which had been dug up and piled just a couple of months before, so quite smooth, howvere if you wanted more craggy a style that would be possible too. I overcoated it with Woodland Scenics plaster, or wotsit hydrocalifornia as they insist on calling it. It was great fun and I recommend it for that reason alone, anything more is a plus eh?

Then it was a bash of colour prior to flocking. I used three types, short dark for the undercoat, longer on top with a few added sprinkles of a flowery flock. The planking was stuck in place, plus a few crates, an oil drum and some single sandbages which we’ve not released yet and the piece was complete. It comes alive with a few figures, these all Uncle Crouchie’s BEF range now available from the ever regal Warlord Games.

Finally the hour spents cutting the seams on all those sandbags and the grain on the planking has proved itself worthwhile now on with the slaughter!

Para-dise Revisited

January 18, 2011

There’s something about the various parachute units which a lot of gamers like, and they’re not strangers to this blog either. When it comes to WW2 the airborne troops take on a legendary air, and this likely explains just why they so popular and rightly so. Although all my efforts have been 6 mm, the Slug has been working on them in decadent 28mm and rather well too as the photo above shows.

It also shows how gamers can save themselves some cash and effort in using out of scale models for the really big things like aircraft. Above is the Airfix Horsa glider in 1/72nd scale which breaks the rule of everything being the same scale, but this is gaming and not scale engineering and as a game representation works perfectly… it’s also a damn sight smaller than a 1/48th ki t- so more gaming space on the table, easier to find and only costs around £15.

Here’s a delightful Tetrarch light tank which we were lucky enough to buy as is from Uncle Crouchie just before Christmas. I’m not sure who makes this one but hopefully Crouchie might let us know should he read this. If anyone feels the need to point out the bleeding obvious (i.e: Tetrarchs were transported by Hamilcar gliders and not Horsa) then please do, it’ll give me an opportunity to edit your comment to something even sillier.

All of the miniatures are Artizan Design which were a gift for the boy Slug for Christmas 2009 based on his preference for Para’s who are wearing berets rather than helmets.

It took me a while to track down who made them like that, but it was worth it as they’re lovely sculptures.

Over the course of a year he’s kept on with these on the back burner and eventually finished them and has a cracking group ready for a fight.

The only help he’s had was with the basing, which he doesn’t like doing.

Who can blame him, especially when it’s a distraction from his growing confidence and skills with a brush.

Of course having finished them just before Christmas and celebrated a project as finished I’m not sure if he was genuinely happy to get a couple more packs of ww2 paras from Santa just a few weeks later.

I image this project may just run, and run, and run…