Posts Tagged ‘figures’

Leaf it out

December 18, 2012

DSC03711-001The fourth 28mm horse I’ve painted is this British officer from Great War Miniatures who only on being based revealed himself to be crookedly mounted. This makes his nationally questionable and suggests he might be a fifth-columnist. It’s a one piece cast so the poor saddle skills aren’t of my making. Aside from from that it’s a pleasant figure which I wanted to make more of so I added a couple of hounds. I don’t remember whose dogs those are, but they suit well.

DSC03708-001I also wanted to try the leaf scatter on the base rather than flock. I’ve rarely seen it used by gamers but it’s all the rage with military modellers. It’s quite difficult to use, the tub has plenty of woody surplus which has to be picked out before application, and being irregular is awkward to lay in any thickness.

DSC03709-001Although suitable for both World Wars I’ll also be using this charactor in VBCW as Hercules Grytpype-Thynne  a caddish officer with an eye on villainy disguised by high rank and aided by a pocket full of gorillas.

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Pull the Udder One

December 18, 2012

DSC03706-001A short post with some poor photos of the Warlord Games dead livestock which I enjoyed painting as the Ayrshire breed, spurred on by them re-releasing them while I still had an unopened blister packet from the original release.

DSC03707-001

When I first saw these I thought they were a must have. The first dead cattle I recall seeing in a war film were those in Saving Private Ryan during the radar station scene. I’m not certain that was a cinematic first, but it’s what they reminded me of, well that and how many animals get slaughtered during war without much notice.

In a Battlefield of their own

November 29, 2012

Happy coincidences are always welcome, especially when they produce figures which fit into somewhere the manufacturer didn’t intend.  These modern figures from Hasslefree fit quite neatly into the world of the popular game “Battlefield 3”. For a player of that game, like me, it does make them irresistable.  The figures are very similar but have a choice of two main weapons and seperate heads.  Giving them different paintjobs makes them look less similar so that’s the course I took.

These come on slotta bases, and like a lot of the smaller producers it’s a restriction which the sculptors strive to escape from. Kevin White is no different in this aspect and the miniatures feet are barely in contact with the slotta bar. As I base on tuppences having such a small area of contact between figure and base can be a problem.

Not wanting to repeat problems I’ve had before when totally removing the slotta bar I decided on a new angle and this was to cut away the bulk of it leaving just a thin strip. This gives a lot more contact area but also allows the lightness sculpted in to the piece. Worth a try and a lot quicker than pinning.

In the computer game the troops have a very loose dress code, so rather than try to replicate a scheme I decided to just go for the gneral Battlefield Casual look which they all seem to have. I’m happy with the finish althoug, yet again, the photos have me sucking my teeth at the touches of dust, the odd wrong dab, etc, which only becomes apprent at this size. Good news is it distracts me from any blurry photos.

Hasslefree are about to release another pair in this series, and I suspect they’ll be as animated, well detailed and generally brilliantly sculpted as we’ve come to expect. A must-paint.

Tim waits for no-one

November 29, 2012

It’s always surprising to see a paintjob you’re perfectly happy with once you’ve taken a photo of it and see it four times large and no more so than with this great figure of Tim Collins from the freebie range from The Assault Group. Enlarged it doesn’t look so good although in part that is down to the narcissistic nature of painting figures combined with the paranoid self-criticism which drives it onward. If you’re ever totally satisfied with your efforts there’s a good chance you’ll just give up there and then having reached the perfection you seek, so I’m not complaining.  It’s a simple figure to paint and I enjoyed it, right up to seeing it so large. Northwards!

He ain’t heavy, he’s my loader…

October 17, 2012

Here’s a couple more Afghan support weapons by Eureka which I picked up at Salute 2012.   They’re the usual joy to paint, even if my photos aren’t very good. The recoiless rifle is on a very big base, and there’s a big space near the loader because the ammo box wasn’t in the bag.

Thankfully Nic at Eureka was happy to send me one all the way from Australia, not that I’ve had time to paint and add it. The weapon was a little tricky to get together right but plenty of testing was the way to do it, with gentle tweaks to get the legs of the two-part tripod the right height.

Here’s the Eureka Afghan mortar, which has one figure sculpted so you can set him up with his hand in the ammo box. Well I was impressed. A much tighter fit on the base which I prefer.

Again a slightly tricky assembly of the weapon with three pieces which have to be glued simultaneously as I see it. Should you glue the tube into the base plate seperately it might not fit onto the bipod without being too splayed. Tricky but not impossible.

Again a fine example of the brilliance of digital photography is the small hair on the base plate while making everything else slightly blurred. The hair has since been removed, imprisoned and under going severe interrogation.

Command & Conquer

October 3, 2012

I wrapped up my British modern forces with this British Infantry Platoon Command from the Assault Group and it’s a fitting end.  This pack contains two officers waving their arm around, a field radio man and a soldier with a 2 inch mortar.

When I started painting the new British MTP camo I was quite hesitant but happy with the eventual results. As I’ve done more it’s become a speedy freehanded joy although it has evolved into getting larger in pattern and lighter in overall shade. Hopefully these will mix well and produce the variations you see across a number of troops in the field.

A small hole was drilled into the top of the radio pack for a small aerial to be added using a thin pin with the head snipped off. It might not be that accurate as I’ve seen some radios which have some folding type of antenna and others which seem to thicken towards the top, almost like a silencer on a gun barrel. It suits my needs of course, and for added realism it’s likely to stop working at the most inconvenient time.

It’s very likely for these pieces to become primary targets for snipers based on the old idea that anyone waving their arms around must be an officer and should be shot first.

The 2 inch mortar is an unusual piece of kit as it’s been used by the British Army in one form or another for almost one hundred years. It started life as the 2 inch Medium Mortar in 1915, only to be dropped two years later.  By 1937 the over-titled Ordnance SBML 2 inch mortar was developed and saw service for decades until the late 1980s, being replaced by the metric L9A1 51mm Light Mortar or 2.02 inch.  Which is what is used today and this chap has. Watch out Terry Taliban.

Die Nacht der Toten

September 2, 2012

The boy Slug has a slowly evolving nazi zombie project inspired, in part, by the Call of Duty game which features the opportunity to shoot Nazi zombies. These figures are part of West Wind Productions Secrets of the Third Reich which we picked up a couple of Salutes ago. Rather uphappily I didn’t enjoy painting these at all. The detail seems a little limited, even confused. I have a sneaking suspicion this might be why these were the ones I was asked to paints.

The bases are the 30mm DS Ruined Flagstone set from Fenris Games, and those I enjoyed working on more than the figures. Slug set the figures on the bases and rather well I think, I really liked the one with a stream trickling through it, and the boy set the figure firmly standing in it.

All-in-all an odd experience. usually I strive to paint up to the sculpt but on these the piece which demanded justice was the base…

Troops Out… for the lads

August 20, 2012

It’s been a productive week on the Jihadistan front, bolstering the good guys with quite a selection of manufacturers and starting with this HMG from Brooks Miniatures. A very sweet support team which I don’t think my photography does justice to.

Again I’ve mounted them on a 40mm Fenris Games laser-cut ply base with various stones and tufts.

The Assault Group figures have become my favourite range for Modern Brits with a wide range even if I only use the helmeted ones. Four more have joined my ranks.

This is their prone pack with a SAW, an HMG, a bog standard SA80/L85 and a very neat sniper.

These have been painted but not based (awaiting bases) but you get the idea.

These will be finished off with the usual stones, sand and tufts.

blahHere’s the Empress Javelin Team which I’ve had unpainted for too long and it’s a handy addition to the forces.

Sadly these chaps come without weapons so I’ve added a couple of Hasslefree guns. Otherwise I’d worry about their personal safety.

The spare Javelin is a nice touch. This team comes with two other figures…

…this chap with a shotgun and a slung SA80 and another sniper. There’s something about snipers which I adore. I have far too many for a proper OoB but so what? They’re fun.

Finally a pack of Brooks Miniatures via Old Glory UK. I wanted a few more plain and simple squaddies with just SA80s to fill out the sections and these suit perfectly. I’ve painted these all in the new MTP camo, I’m not sure how accurate I’m doing it but it looks right to me and I’ve got it down to quite a rapid paint technique. Missing the big military shows over the last couple of years I’ve not had a good look at it, that’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it.

Here’s a comparison shot of individual figures, TAG, Empress, Brooks, LAM German Marine, Eureka German Bundeswehr.

And one of support teams; Empress, Brooks and TAG.

Anarchy in the UK

July 18, 2012

Last week I set myself the task of painting as many figures as I could in a week and choose to hack a trail through my pile of figures for a Very British Civil War, as well as accidently buying some more. Here you can see how  far I got. Firstly my fabourite of the bunch is this trio from the Royal household; Edward VIII, Wallace Simpson and a lady waiting around – yes a lady-in-waiting. Delightful sculpts on and all, the ones of Eddie and that woman being freebies from the Newark Irregulars Partizan shows and quite difficult to get hold of if, like me, you can’t make it to the show.  A while back a pair of these were on Ebay for a whooping £8 a piece, but thankfully the wonderful Irregukar Tricks heard about a few folk seeking these figures and incredibly generously sent pairs out to those in need without even asking for postage. What a diamond gent. Three cheers for him!

The lady in waiting was very simple, leaving more intricate work for the Royals. Gave him a golden gun, very likely a gift from some foreign despot, while she has a Chanel looking two piece with matching shoes. Great fun to paint. I put only red, white and blue flowers on the King’s base, while Simpson got just scarlet.

The two Empress figures on the left are the cause of this painting fury inspired by another piece of gamer-on-gamer generosity. This time it was Ook with an offer of free figures over on VBCF. I’ve just finished reading Orwell’s “Homage to Catalonia” and aside from enjoying it a great deal it produced a desire to field some anarchists and those figures suited well I thought for Officers and NCOs, having slipped off economic restraint I bought both packs of Bolt Action’s partisans, which include the two on the right which fit perfectly. The Gods smile down eh?

Thankfully there’s a few armed women in the pack too. There’s really not enough fighting women miniatures around so I’m always happy to find more. It’s a myth to siggest they can’t fight, they fought furiously in the early days of the Spanish Civil War and many still do today even as terrorists.

Although I’ve given these a hint of their anarcho-syndacalist cause I have tried to keep them pretty generic, so they could form any militia for VBCW, SCW or even as partisans as intended.

Apologies for the blur on this one… they’re running.

The one on the left looks, yo me, like a Paul Hicks sculpt.

Talking of the maestro here are a pair of his on the left. The ever wonderful Mutton Chop miniatures are some of the most complicated I’ve ever seen, they could make you knees tremble with their details but a steady nerve and a steadier paintbrush really delivers a great finished figure. The pair on the right are meant for BUF militia but again I’ve kept them generically suitable for other games.

The Lewis gun is almost a holy relic or heathen fetish in the world of VBCW. We all really like them and want lots of them… so here’s some for the BUF using Gripping Beast figures. These come with loose heads so you can set them as you see fit and that’s handy if you want more than a pair of them.

The pair on the right are from Volksturm pack we picked up from where we don’t recall, they’re a trifle small and under detailed, especially compared to the brutes beside them.

Finally the most generic piece, a Vickers HMG. Akthough there’s some joy to be had in having HMG teams in every flavour you might ever play I thought it might make some small sense to just base one  all alone, and then a pair of figures can be set sadie it to show whose it is. Not exciting but practical. So in total I managed thirty-three figures and one HMG, which I’m chuffed with. This week I will be mainly talking to those strangers in my house called family.

Rocket Man

May 10, 2012

With Salute 2012 now a happy memory and a dent to the wallet it’s time to crack on with what we spent our cash on. The boy Slug beat me in the race with his Dwarves from Akula, while I’ve been slower off the mark. One thing I did manage in my consumerism was to get the rest of the Taliban, or Afghan Guerillas as they call them, from Eureka. So now I have every piece they make and I’m euphoric about them, so much so as to have painted some already.

It was good to see the Eureka gang at Salute but my being prearmed with sarcasm about the Ashes, Ricky Pontin, and many other antipodean delights proved to be a waste of time. I didn’t know that Nic from Eureka was from Yorkshire, and I’d left my Geoff Boycott gags at home. Alongside him were two seppos, and one solitary Aussie who lived in London. A genuine surprise but so cosmopolitan as to be delicious. Unfortunately Kosta Heristanidis wasn’t there so compliments galore for his great sculpting had to be tolerated by everyone else.

There really is something about Kosta’s work which I find delightful, good sculpting is only part of it -both in detail and charactor, there’s also something aboput painting them with every fold and line fitting my brush as if to tempt the paint into place. With some figures painting can be a chore, with these it’s an encouraged caress.

This piece, as I imagine you’ve gathered, is the rocket launcher. There’s a pair of loaders, the launcher plus all the bits and bobs to turn this base into a mini diorama. The launchers is eleven pieces of metal which all fit together first time, and there’s only the tiniest of mould lines on the figures. I can’t recommend these enough. However if the idea of ordering all the way from Victoria worries you try the Isle of Wight instead.

Again I’ve based this on a laser zapped custom sized base from Fenris Games, they’re a great idea well priced and give you as much room as you want. I like mine small as possible and really busy – Job Done!